Ann Stem Cells Regen Med | Volume 2, Issue 1 | Review Article | Open Access

Mesenchymal Stem Cells; the Knife Cuts on Both Sides of Breast Cancer

Alaa Alshareeda T*

Department of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Saudi Arabia

*Correspondance to: Alaa Alshareeda T 

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Abstract

The development and progression of any tumour is not only determined by the corresponding cancer cells but also by the microenvironment of the tumour. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types such as Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), immune cells, and endothelial cells, through the extracellular matrix and different soluble factors. Breast Cancer (BC) is a leading cause of death in women around the world. BC is not a single disease, but it is a collection of diseases that have different histopathological features, genetic and genomic variability, and the significant prognostic factors varied by diagnosis. MSCs derived from adipose tissue, bone marrow, placenta and other tissue, are multipotent adult cells with potential to treat human diseases such as cancer. A major development has been introduced in defining cellular hierarchy and the niche of stem cell in the human mammary gland. For decades autologous fat grafting has been suggested to be used after mastectomy for reconstructive purposes (restore form and anatomy). Additionally, adipose fat has the inherent advantage of being autologous tissue. It is considered to be the best natural-appearing filler; nevertheless given its unpredictable engraftment and rates of retention, it lacks reliability. Presently, stem cells have become the targets of BC therapy, although the investigations are mostly on a basic stage level. In this review we discuss the double‚Äźedged sword of MSC in BC.

Keywords:

Breast cancer; Mesenchymal stem cells; MSCs receptors; Adipose fat; Breast construction

Citation:

Alaa Alshareeda T. Mesenchymal Stem Cells; the Knife Cuts on Both Sides of Breast Cancer. Annals Stem Cell Regenerat Med. 2019; 2(1): 1012.

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